About jetson nano ubuntu disks tool

Hello

disks tool : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNOME_Disks

We are making an NVR using Jetson nano.
I use a USB hard disk as a storage device.
To mount it with /mnt/C, I use a tool called disks built into the jetson NANO ubuntu.
Hard disks are identified by their disk label.

However, when the problem reboots, the hard disk is remounted and /mnt/C is duplicated in /etc/fstab.

How do I fix this?

In addition, I would like to know if it is okay to create and distribute oem images with a program like gparted other than the disks tool installed.

Thank you.

Please remove 99-nv-ufs-mount.rules under /etc/udev/rules.d.

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Hello,

Are there any known issues in the file you are reporting?
Can you tell me the reason for the deletion?

Thank you.

The rule will auto mount the device to specific place. If you want to mount it by yourself, just remove it.

Hello,

If I delete this, will end users not be able to use the auto mount feature?

When a user uses something like a USB drive, I want it to be mounted automatically again.

Thank you.

The gnome desktop will still help mount the usb drive.

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FYI, “/etc/fstab” should not be edited dynamically by the system during boot. I am very curious, are you saying that if you delete the “/media” rule in fstab, that it gets put back in automatically? The fstab rule should override an automount if the device being mounted is found. If things are not working how you’d like, then you might post the line in fstab which is misbehaving.

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Hello,

Thanks for the answer.

Can I delete media rules from fstab?

Thank you.

Yes, if you don’t like it. You could just comment the line out to test (put a hash mark “#” at the start of the line to make the line inert).

I want to emphasize that some rules in fstab make finding a device mandatory before boot continues, but other options can make it possible for fstab to skip a line if the hard drive device is not found. Unless the device is needed for boot it is safe to comment out most any device as a test.

“udev” has its own rules, but typically, if you want to add a line in fstab which allows mounting a specific device (or specific UUID) without hanging up when missing, then that is most likely to take precedence over udev, but you’d have to test to be sure.

What do you really want to occur? Which device are you using, and will it always be there, or just be there some of the time? With that device installed, how does it show up in “lsblk -f”?

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